Sinningia tuberosa

  1. Blooming from the tuber
  2. Plant habits
  3. Feature table
  4. External link
  5. Publication and etymology

This picture was taken by Dave Zaitlin, of his own plant.

tuberosa: flowers
 
tuberosa: tuber

Blooming from the tuber

This informative picture, taken by Karyn Cichocki, of her own plant, shows the flowerstalks and petioles growing directly from the tuber.

One might expect that this species would be closely related to another sinningia species which blooms directly from the tuber, namely Sinningia defoliata.  Such is not the case, however, as they are in different clades.  S. tuberosa is in the Sinningia clade, grouped around S. speciosa, while S. defoliata is in the Corytholoma clade, a group of mostly tall and/or sticky-leaved species.



 

Plant Habits

tuberosa: leaf

The plant in this picture looks like it could be Sinningia defoliata -- but it isn't.  For one thing, the leaf is not sticky like defoliata's.  The second difference can be seen in the picture below, which shows the base and tuber top of the plant in the picture to the left. Clearly visible is the ordinary-looking stem and its side shoot.

tuberosa: base

There is one way in which this species differs from the other "unifoliate" sinningias, including S. defoliata, S. helionana, and S. sp. "Pancas".  The seedlings of those three species look very different from the mature plant and show no signs of "unifoliate" behavior.  S. tuberosa has its characteristic growth pattern from the beginning, with unifoliate stems arising directly from the tuber.

(That is my recollection anyway.  If one of my plants would ever bloom, I could set some seed and observe the seedlings from the beginning.) [Written April 2017.]

tuberosa: leaf

This plant looks more like a regular sinningia, with multiple leaves. However, the leaves are attached directly to the tuber, through petiole-like stems.

tuberosa: plant

This plant looks more like a regular sinningia, but with much smaller leaves than the one above.

These three plants were all grown from the same batch of seed, sown in 2009.  The photographs were taken in 2016 and 2017.

None of these plants has bloomed.


Feature table for Sinningia tuberosa

Plant Description

Growth No stem
Habit Rosette-like
Leaves Petiole from tuber (judging by Sinningia defoliata and Sinningia helioana ("Santa Teresa"), which also have leaves which appear to grow directly from the tuber but which actually have petiole-like stems, the leaves of S. tuberosa probably are borne on very short petiole-like stems).
Dormancy  

Flowering

Inflorescence Flowers from tuber
Season Summer
Flower Red, tubular

Horticultural aspects

Hardiness  

Botany

Taxonomic group By itself in the Sinningia clade.



External Link

See Mauro Peixoto's Brazilian Plants site for a page about S. tuberosa.

Publication

As Gesnera tuberosa by Martius, in 1829.
As Sinningia tuberosa by H.E. Moore, in 1973.

Etymology: From Latin tuber ("swelling").