Sinningia cochlearis

  1. Leaf
  2. Feature table
  3. Publication and etymology

This picture, taken May 28, 2007, shows the flowerstalk on a plant grown by Jon Dixon, northern California's local source for this species.

Sinningia cochlearis is closely related to S. gigantifolia.

Because S. gigantifolia has a wider geographical range than S. cochlearis, and the range of S. cochlearis is contained within that of S. gigantifolia, Perret et al. conclude that S. cochlearis has evolved from within S. gigantifolia with specialization for a particular type of environment (open highlands rather than highland forest).

Sinningia cochlearis


 
Sinningia cochlearis

Leaf

Most sinningia leaves have smooth edges or lightly indented ones, but S. cochlearis is unusual in having distinctly scalloped leaves, as in the picture to the right.

Note how one side of the leaf base overlaps the other side.  This slightly spiraled arrangement may be the source of the name of this species (see etymology below).




Feature table for Sinningia cochlearis

Plant Description

Growth Indeterminate
Habit Stem more or less upright.
Leaves Green, scalloped, cordate
Dormancy Leaves fully deciduous.  Stems die back to one or two nodes above previous year's abscission point.

Flowering

Inflorescence Flowers on extended axis
Season Blooms in summer
Flower Red, tubular

Horticultural aspects

Hardiness I have no data yet

Botany

Taxonomic group In a subgroup with S. gigantifolia within the Sinningia clade.




Publication

Hooker, 1840, as Gesneria cochlearis.  Chautems transferred it to Sinningia in 1990.

Etymology: Latin cochlea means "snail".

Presumably, the reference is to the way one side of the leaf base overlaps the other side.  See the picture above.